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National Offender Re-Entry Association

The Association that help you STOP the revolving jail door.

Reentry Programs For Ex-Offenders

Ex-offender reentry programs are proven to help recidivism rates among all ex-offenders regardless of sex, race or creed. Many ex-offenders have a very hard time on the outside after serving their sentences. Ex-offenders have difficulties finding jobs, adequate housing or even attaining photo identification. These difficulties lead to more problems and often cause the ex-offender to get into trouble again.


The purpose of ex-offender reentry programs are to mitigate these problems to allow the offender to concentrate on adjusting to life on the outside. Many programs offer short term housing, job assistance and often have other spiritual and therapy aspects within the program.


Reentry programs also allow ex-offenders to befriend others that are in their same position. This offers a support system that can be helpful and also promotes a team environment.  Some reentry programs are coed while other may only be for male or female ex-offenders.


Even if you feel that you do not need the help of a reentry program it may be wise to at least investigate any programs that are in your area.  We wish you all the best and hope that you are able to find a program that meets your needs.

We've loved every minute of our journey

In 2008 National Offender Re-Entry Association formerly A hand Up Not A Hand Out was born. With One Passion, One Vision and One Investor; Ms. Settles set out to help and assist re-entry offenders looking to restore, rebuild, and reapply themselves in an effort to decrease their chances of recidivating back once release.  
The Unfair Roadblock: More than 600,000 individuals are released from federal and state prisons every year; hundreds of thousands are leaving local jails or are serving their sentences in the community. As these individuals seek employment or housing and work to become productive members of society they will not only need to overcome the stigma associated with having a criminal record – even after they have completed their sentence and fully paid their debt to society – they will often encounter federal and state laws and policies that make successful reentry much more difficult.